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How I Completely Broke Reaper

Sometimes… most of the time… you don’t get everything right the first time.

Until Wednesday I had been taking signups for the beta PT Actions Kit release (you can still sign up for release info, but I’ve since taken down the script downloads).  The feedback I’ve gotten on it has varied wildly from the simple “this is awesome!” to serious bugs.

The most serious of these bugs currently affects Mac OSX users.  Without getting too technical, due to the way window handling works in OSX – my current workflow completely shits the bed for Mac users.  That really sucks and is a huge kick in the nuts considering the initial development started thanks to a guy who works on a Mac.

But I’m routinely one to make (as I quoted to my wife the other week) “fucking epic lemonade out of a pile of lemons” – so I wanted to turn this into something hopeful/inspiring to you.

If you look at the featured photo above you’ll see what I was working on yesterday – learning to build a new UI within Reaper itself to handle my problems.  I turned this into a background process infinite loop that royally destroyed Reaper and crashed it over and over again (if you don’t know what an infinite loop is – imagine audio feedback that just never stopped feeding back AND murdered everyone before the speakers blew).

What should you take from this?

Everyone struggles and fails.  The only difference between those who succeed and those who don’t is only who gets back up and tries again.

I drove my wife to work this morning and brainstormed a completely different way to make the script run that won’t bork the OSX users.  That reminded me that there’s always a path to travel.  There are infinite ways, paths, and possibilities when you’re creating.  That means that when you fail, you’re only a few steps away from success.  So don’t stop working at it.

Due to this bug, I’m going to be releasing the PT Actions Kit later than I expected.  It’s a bit sad, and I’m eager to jump into other projects, but there’s not really a question of whether or not this will come out and help people.  It will, and the only thing that would stop it is simply me deciding not to try anymore.

If you’re interested in hearing more and getting informed when it’s released – use the signup form on the right side of the page to add yourself to my email list.

Hope this gives you a little pat on the back and encourages you to keep working hard!


Copyright 2016-2017, Adam T. Croft, all rights reserved.

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Things I Learned via Building the PT Actions Kit

Building the PT Actions Kit has been a seriously rewarding experience.  I’m planning on doing a full post-mortem of the process after the full release, but I figured sharing a shorter list now would be a good way to reflect back at kind of a mid-point in the project.

Without further ado…

Continue reading Things I Learned via Building the PT Actions Kit


Copyright 2016-2017, Adam T. Croft, all rights reserved.

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The secret to success in 2017

The tweet above is the secret to life.  I’m not kidding.  I may have interesting and informative things to share – but that advice is some of the best I’ve got.

I’ve got some more personal-related updates today, so nothing major in the audio or programming realms.  Instead I’m going to let you in on some updates, where I’m at, and what you should expect in the near-ish future.

Continue reading The secret to success in 2017


Copyright 2016-2017, Adam T. Croft, all rights reserved.

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Guy Somberg’s Lessons in Audio Programming

I’m going to share a sweet video about audio programming below, but before I do a few quick notes from this week:

In case you missed it, I’ve added two new pages to the site.  There is now an index of all the posts about beginning to program Reascripts for Reaper (I’d argue the easiest/fastest way to learn to code for non-coding audio people).  Also, I’ve posted a list of resources for audio-related programming for your perusal – books, courses, frameworks, etc.

Anyway, onto the rest…

Continue reading Guy Somberg’s Lessons in Audio Programming


Copyright 2016-2017, Adam T. Croft, all rights reserved.

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How to turn one script into three

If you’ve read through the previous post in this series then you’ve got a completed Reascript that will arm your selected tracks and disarm any armed tracks first.

At this point, I could go encourage you to enjoy your creative freedom and plow through some script ideas of your own.  You can totally do that, or you can read this post first.

Why do I encourage the latter?  Because, my friend, you are on the verge of having 3 fully functional scripts and you don’t even know it.  If you read the rest, you’ll have them made fast and learn some cool shit in the process!

Continue reading How to turn one script into three


Copyright 2016-2017, Adam T. Croft, all rights reserved.

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Finishing your first Reascript

Welcome to the 2nd week of 2017 ladies and gents (at least when I’m writing this post)!  We’re going to start the week off right and do something you didn’t think you could do a few days ago: finish your 2nd Reascript that does some legitimate stuff!

This is going to be a very big update to our script (in relation to what we already have written from all the previous posts.  We’re also going to introduce the concept of if statements and write another loop similar to the one we already have.

Hold onto your pants, I’ll explain it all below.

Continue reading Finishing your first Reascript


Copyright 2016-2017, Adam T. Croft, all rights reserved.

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Record Arm All Selected Tracks with Reascript

cksIf you’ve been following along with my previous Reascript posts, you know we previously wrote a script that record arms your currently selected track.

I’m going to help you expand on that today as our script is a little broken with how it currently works.  You can select multiple tracks, but if you do only the topmost track will be armed for record when you run the script.

To fix this, we’re going to update the script to arm all selected tracks by introducing you to the concept of the for loop.

Continue reading Record Arm All Selected Tracks with Reascript


Copyright 2016-2017, Adam T. Croft, all rights reserved.

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Record Arm with Reascript

If you’ve been following along with my recent Reascript posts, we’ve officially gotten through the hard stuff and the boring stuff.  You’ve officially written your first Reascript too, but it hasn’t exactly been useful to you.

Today we start changing all of that.  Over the next few days, I’m going to walk you through a script that Record Arms all of your currently selected tracks, and if any tracks are already armed to record it will clear them all for you first.

Sweet right?  First, we have to figure out how to record arm one track.  We’ll build from there.  That’s what we’ll work on today. Continue reading Record Arm with Reascript


Copyright 2016-2017, Adam T. Croft, all rights reserved.

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Commenting your Reascript

Imagine this scenario (you’ve probably been in it before):

You’ve written 80% of a song.  It has a great vibe, you’re totally in the flow of things and it’s awesome.  But it’s 3am and you have to work in the morning (or there’s some other way that real life happens) and you have to stop.

You all know the dilemma – you stop, you lose the vibe, and if you get back to the song tomorrow it just won’t be the same.  Most likely you’ll get back to it in a week (hey, you’re a musician – the opposite sex finds you attractive and you have to go out, right?!).  By the time you get back to it, the magic is gone and you have no clue what you were doing and how to pick up where you left off.

I know this sounds crazy, but this happens in programming too (okay, well maybe not the going out part – but Netflix man!  c’mon!).

This is why you need to comment your code.  Today I’m going to take the work out of your hands and show you exactly how to use comments and use them well. Continue reading Commenting your Reascript


Copyright 2016-2017, Adam T. Croft, all rights reserved.

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Write a Reascript: Hello, World

Happy 2017 everybody!  Hope it’s seeing you well.  It’s a super sunny (albeit cold) day here in Seattle, so I’m going to enjoy that and get on teaching you some Reascript!

Hello, World

Once again – I’m aiming this at audio folks who have never programmed a line of code in their lives.  Don’t worry friends, we’ll get complicated in due time but today we’re going to give you a “quick win” and have you write the most simple Reascript that you possibly can. Continue reading Write a Reascript: Hello, World


Copyright 2016-2017, Adam T. Croft, all rights reserved.